I have written a few posts about the benefits of regular relevant blog posts, and this morning I decided it was worth analysing my own blog to see if it’s helped me in any way. I analysed various stats and the results were quite interesting.

I started this blog back in January and since then have written 63 posts, with an additional 4 guest posts. My assorted posts have viewed 5,167 times and 25 of them have been reposted to other blogs. My most read post was “When personal branding goes too far” with 389 unique reads, my least read post was something about the current Ashes series – dreams of a career in sports journalism sadly ripped at the seams! I have had my content shared (by others) over 400 times on LinkedIn and Twitter.

However – by far my proudest achievement is my Google ranking! Late last year, I Googled myself from an anonymous browsing window, and, flicking through the 209 million results, got bored by page 24 and gave up. I repeated this search this morning and found I have moved up to page 2 of the Google results for Chris Grant. When I added extra search terms like sales, marketing or content, I found myself on page one!

I haven’t paid anyone for SEO, I haven’t been writing for search visibility, I have simply written regular content about what I do. I am one person with a very common (or so it would seem by the 209 million results) name and I have managed to catapult myself up the rankings with an average of 2 blog posts a week for 7 months.

Takeaways

Ego surfing aside, the exercise proved to me the validity of regular blogging that is relevant to your field; as well as the importance of keeping at it even though the initial return can be dispiriting.

If that is what an individual that never blogged before can do, imagine the effect of getting several of the key people within your organisation to write about their niche for your company blog on a regular basis.

It’s worth doing some analysis! For me this exercise has given good insight into what topics are popular (and what isn’t). If this was a company blog, I would be able to plan my ongoing content strategy and be sure to stay on message - as it is I might just let the occasional cricket post appear!